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DAZ Studio Camera Tutorial by Thyranq DAZ Studio Camera Tutorial by Thyranq

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A quick, easy to follow camera tutorial for DAZ Studio!

This tutorial will explain the parameters of the Studio cameras - the focal length, focal distance, and f/stop, as well as show you what each one does, and how to use them.

Many people have asked for a tutorial on how I do Depth of Field in my renders, and here it is! I've also included a list of f/stop values that I commonly use in my images, along with the focal length setting that I most often use.

This tutorial was set up using DAZ Studio 3, but everything is entirely applicable to DAZ Studio 4 as well. I'm not certain, however, about versions earlier than 3, as I have not used them.

I hope you can learn something from this, and that you find it useful! Thanks!
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:icondionysianexperience:
DionysianExperience Featured By Owner Sep 15, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for taking the time to create this...very helpful. 
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:icongaiuscaesarii:
GaiusCaesarII Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2016
very nice   thanks :)
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:iconbecarra:
Becarra Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2016  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Always nice to have this reference. Thank you :)
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:iconhoorayforsloth:
HoorayForSloth Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2015
Very useful tutorial. Thanks!
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:iconpoppechild:
Poppechild Featured By Owner Jul 16, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
THANK YOU!!!! I was looking for somenthing like this. :hug:
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:iconpauladaruk:
pauladaruk Featured By Owner Apr 28, 2014
That's a great tutorial Simple and easy to understand even for a non English. Thank you a lot for this! :D
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:iconvalorie13:
Valorie13 Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2014
Thank you. 
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:iconxgnyc:
xgnyc Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you, this is wonderful! :clap:
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:iconmarshian44:
marshian44 Featured By Owner Jan 14, 2013
This tutorial is great- so much time goes into figuring this stuff out on my own- so Thank You!

Would you consider a tutorial on caustics? Loading/Using a camera and caustic surfaces (DAZ default glass shader?)

Maybe it all starts in the Caustic Shader Mixer sample scene?
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2013
Thanks a lot! Glad you found it useful! :)

I'd love to do a tutorial on caustics, sadly, however, I can never get them to work oustide of the example scene that comes with Studio :(
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:iconmarshian44:
marshian44 Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2013
I found that too. It takes 3 things with specific shaders/qualities to make it happen- camera, lighting and the object. Maybe its too many parameters to monkey with... maybe on a rainy day I'll dig back in.
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:iconmet2art:
met2art Featured By Owner Aug 18, 2012  Professional Photographer
I'm about to dive into DAZ, and seeing this made my night! As a professional photographer it's very reassuring to see this. This means I can actually work like a photographer in my scene and apply what I know rather than learn an entirely new system for figuring out how to shoot my scenes!
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012
Glad to hear it was of help to you :)

It's still going to take a bit of getting used to, but you've got quite a leg-up with a photography background. Lighting is probably going to be the big kick-in-the-butt there, as Studio's lights don't behave like REAL lights. It can be easy enough to fake, or you can always have a look at the Reality plugin (which uses Luxrender for the rendering, and Lux treats light sources as REAL, physical lights - quite a joy for photographers). You can have a look at Reality here: [link]
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:iconmet2art:
met2art Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012  Professional Photographer
Thank you very much for the tips and link. I had some experience with 3D modeling and lighting many years ago with the MS-DOS version of 3D Studio 4. I remember the frustrations of getting the lights to behave the way I wanted, and that was without the benefit of raytracing too.
Hopefully some of the basics of lighting and texturing will translate. I also read through the tutorials in the #3DPetiteGirls tutorials section which gave me some insight to how DAZ's lights work. Those will go a long way toward helping me get good results!

Lux looks amazing, although for now I'd like to spend as little money as possible on "extras" until I feel comfortable with DAZ and the results.
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Aug 19, 2012
I was the same way, and still am to an extent. You can get some amazing results straight out of DAZ Studio, and I wanted to get to a comfortable level with that before diving into anything else. Only drawback there is when I picked up Reality, I had to UNlearn all the tricks I picked up from Studio lighting, because with Luxrender you don't need the tricks - it behaves like actual light. All the same, though, it was a lot easier to UNlearn the DAZ tricks than it was to learn them in the first place lol

I don't find lighting all that difficult in Studio, and grasped it pretty quickly, but it's definitely the #1 thing that trips people up. Using something like Uberenvironment to fill the scene with the ambient lighting, then using Spotlights/Distant lights/Point Lights to put in the 'key' light and lighting direction works quite well for me. It can be a bit difficult to get the lighting right without Uberenvironment for the simple fact that the lighting doesn't 'bounce', it just hits something and stops, so filling in the areas that the lights don't get to can be a bit tricky when you're trying to keep it all natural looking - which is where, as I mentioned, Uberenvironment comes in. It fills in all the gaps with nice global illumination, so you don't end up with unlit parts of the scene. It's definitely worth your time reading the light tutorials that you've been checking out, as, if I recall correctly, they talk a bit about the different settings of Uberenvironment, which can be key to making it work the way you want it to.

Best of luck to ya ;)
And if you need any help, tips, or anything, feel free to fire me over a note or something and I'll be glad to help out any way I can ;)
Cheers!
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:iconmet2art:
met2art Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2012  Professional Photographer
Given my past experience with 3D Studio r4, chances are the DAZ lighting will make more sense to me. It didn't support scattering or or bounce, so I had to make do with creating ambient omni light sources and then using spots to create key lighting, and selectively turning shadows on/off for specific lights to get the proper effect. On the other hand, Lux would make it much easier to replicate the studio lighting setups that I use for model photography. In any case I will have to wait, as I'm using DAZ 4.5, and the current version of Lux (2.2) apparently doesn't work for it. Supposedly version 2.5 (coming soon) will work.

That's all just as well since I've got plenty of other things to learn before I need to become overly concerned about lighting for final renders. The basics orders of operation for loading, dressing characters is quite a challenge in and of itself, let alone posing them and then deciding on rendering options. From a "newbie" perspective, the methodology of organizing characters, clothing, props and loading them all into a cohesive scene feels like a nightmare! I'm hoping it'll get easier as I continue to play with it.

I think I have a LOT to unlearn from my early 3D days. :)
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2012
Yeah, there's a lot to take in. The order of things depends on the person, really, and whether or not you have an image in mind, or you're just fiddling around until one pops at you.

I know some people like to do posing first, then cloth, then background. Others like to cloth first, background, pose, etc etc, and toss lighting in there, too, which some people like to do before the character is clothed, others like to do it after - up to the artist really.

Sounds like you should be able to grasp the lighting half decently, though, which is a good thing, cause like I said, it's the number one thing that trips people up.

I'm only a note away if you need any help or anything ;)
Best of luck to ya!
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:iconmet2art:
met2art Featured By Owner Aug 21, 2012  Professional Photographer
For now I'll save the clothing for another day and just play with some naked figures to try to get the basics of posing and lighting. I need to take it slow or else I get overly ambitious and then get frustrated with not being able to render what I'm seeing in my mind. :)

Just for laughs and nostalgia I uploaded some of my really old 3D Studio r4 renders in my scrapbook. Feel free to check 'em out and see what I was doing with modeling, texturing and lighting about fifteen years ago. :)
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:iconmelaniel2010:
MelanieL2010 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2011
Thanks for this - it looks very useful.
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2011
You're welcome :)
I hope it is of use ;)
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:iconebrukash:
EbruKash Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you! It helps me much.
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2011
You're welcome
Very glad I could help :)
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:iconneilv:
NeilV Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
very nice work
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2011
Thanks!
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:iconjamminwolfie:
jamminwolfie Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Awesome tut, buddy! :)
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011
Thanks, Wolfie!
I know camera controls are something a lot of users struggle with, so I'm glad to be able to help out and try and teach people about what they do and how they work :D
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:iconjamminwolfie:
jamminwolfie Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Absolutely welcome, friend! :)
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:iconelynda:
Elynda Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011
Never have gotten DOF to work properly, so this was a very welcomed tutorial.
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011
Thanks :D
I hope it helps!
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:icontoadz:
toadz Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011
AWESOME! Thanks for making this dude, I know there will be plenty of people ithcing to know how you do your DOF stuff, cus I know I am one of them! Thank you for taking the time to share your knowledge with us, it is much appreciated :D
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011
You're quite welcome :D
I'm glad to finally have it up - it's been far too long since I said I was going to do this.

I just hope it's useful to people :)
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:icontoadz:
toadz Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2011
I am sure there will be plenty of people who find it usefull!
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:iconsqualllion1:
SquallLion1 Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I THINK we did a great job about this tutorial.
thus, I regret you didn't give the screenshot of the DOF parameters.
now, I prefer cheating: made my own blur with The GIMP (the blur of 3Delight is not beautiful)
go on, go on!
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:iconthyranq:
Thyranq Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011
Thanks, Squall.
I probably should have put in a screenshot of the DoF parameters - it actually never occurred to me at the time to do it, I just got so wrapped up in explaining things.

I'll probably do an edit sometime soon and drop one in - thanks for pointing that out ;)
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:iconsqualllion1:
SquallLion1 Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2011  Hobbyist Digital Artist
ok.
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